Thursday , 21 September 2017


20 U.S. Companies With the HIGHest Dividend Yields – Take a Look

In a new report, Morgan Stanley’s global equity strategy team identifies 20 U.S. companies with the most attractive and sustainable dividend yields. Take a look!

So says Mamta Badkar (www.businessinsider.com) who “ranked the stocks by their dividend yield, and included data on their payout ratio (amount of earnings paid out in dividends) and net debt / capitalization ratio (the higher this ratio the more levered the company)” noting that “all companies on the list have a market cap of over $2 billion and a dividend yield over 2.25 percent but under 6 percent”.

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