Friday , 20 April 2018


Inflation/Deflation

Hyperinflation In The U.S. — A Real Or Imagined Threat?

After seeing the latest string of events unfold right before our eyes, many are openly pondering whether we may see hyperinflation hit the US shores. Rather than ponder Trump’s latest executive orders or over the top pronouncements, let us first look at what hyperinflation is and how it works.

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Inflation: What Is It? What Isn’t? Who’s Responsible For It?

Inflation is the debasement of money by the government. PERIOD. It is NOT a general increase in the level of prices for goods and services. These statements are critical to an understanding and correct interpretation of events which are happening today - or expected to happen - that are casually attributable to inflation. Let's go one step further as to what inflation is, what it isn't and who's responsible for it.

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What the Discrepancy Between the CPI and the Big Mac Index Tells Us

Higher prices (inflation) are a natural consequence of our ever increasing monetary supply and the U.S. Department of Labor tracks those increases via a basket of common consumer goods which is known as the Consumer Price Index (CPI) but reveals a major discrepancy with The Economist's Big Mac index. Why is that?

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Inflation Expectations Likely To Continue – Here’s Why

After declaring inflation all but gone last summer, investors are now deciding that calling the time-of-death might have been a bit premature. Starting in September and accelerating post-election, 10-year inflation expectations, measured by 10-year Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS), are surging [and, as I see it there] are four reasons why I think the rebound in inflation and inflation expectations is likely to continue into 2017.

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How to Protect Your Portfolio From Inflation

Inflation lurks in the shadows. It destroys value by gradually eroding real returns over time. It is financial death by a thousand cuts. Investors too often look at "the numbers" in their portfolio without asking what those numbers can actually buy over time. It's a classic mistake that John Maynard Keynes termed "money illusion."

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