Tuesday , 12 December 2017


Economy

Alf Field: America’s Current Account Deficit Causing World’s Financial Crisis! Here’s Why

currency-crisis

The onset of the world’s worst financial crisis in many decades is one of the most important factors (if not the most important factor) currently influencing investment decisions. The crisis has created chaos and confusion. Not many people understand how the world has arrived at this unfortunate situation. This report endeavours to identify the underlying causes of the crisis and explains why the USA current account deficit has been the main destabilising force in world finance. Words: 3806

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The Developing Disaster Facing the US Dollar & the World

global-financial-crisis

When the supply of something is increased sharply relative to demand, the value of that commodity will decline. If the supply continues to increase rapidly and indefinitely, then that item will become worth less and less, with the potential to finally become nearly worthless. This is the Developing Disaster facing the US Dollar and the world. This is the factor that could become the single most important criterion in investment allocation decisions and possibly even for individual financial survival.

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Your House: A Home, An Investment or a Ponzi Scheme?

real-estate2

In the past few decades, the concept of home ownership has been completely turned on its head. Previously, homes were considered a very long-term consumption good...[No one] ever considered tripling the value of their homes by retirement time and selling them to move beachside yet, somehow along the way, this became a reasonable investment expectation. Even today, home buyers still make their purchases with the hopes of escalating prices. [It begs answers to these questions: Is a house just a home? Should a house be expected to behave like an investment? Is the housing game nothing more than a Ponzi scheme where the end buyer before the market corrects becomes the "greater fool"? Let's try and answer those questions.] Words: 935

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Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution – Welcome to 2020 & Beyond!

wearable technology

In 1998, Kodak had 170,000 employees and sold 85% of all photo paper worldwide. Within just a few years, their business model disappeared and they went bankrupt. What happened to Kodak will happen in a lot of industries in the next 10 years - and most people don't see it coming. Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution. Welcome to the Exponential Age.

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