Thursday , 23 March 2017


Gold

History Says We Could See $3,000 Gold & $75 Silver

fine silver fine gold

Precious metals have posted their best quarter in nearly 30 years and mining stocks are soaring from oversold multi-year lows. Those that were willing to buy when everyone else was selling have been handsomely rewarded in 2016 but we believe the gains are just getting started. In fact, gold would need to climb to somewhere around $3,000 per ounce to match the gains that gold experienced after bouncing from its prior bottoms and silver would need to climb towards $75 per ounce.

Read More »

The Price of Gold Could Be Repeating History – Here’s Why

PD-Gold-Nuggets8-300x199

With inflation picking up but the Fed unable to hike because of the significant global volatility RBC speculates that there are now growing parallels to the 1970s when external pressures and fragile growth rates did not allow the Fed to hike. This was also notably a time of strong gold price appreciation. Could the gold price be repeating history?

Read More »

Gold Could Reach $2,000 Within A Year & $4,000 – $6,000 by 2020 – Here’s Why

gold rise

You wouldn’t know it reading the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, or the other popular investment news sources . . . but thus far this year gold prices are up some 16 percent, making the yellow metal just about the top-performing investment asset class of 2016. We expect gold will continue to be one of the best – if not the best – investment-asset class in the months and years ahead. In fact, by this time next year, gold prices could challenge or even surpass their all-time high of $1,924 an ounce reached briefly in September 2011 and, as outlandish as it may seem, gold could double or even triple its historic high by the end of this decade.

Read More »

Gov’ts Will Need & Want & Engineer Higher Gold Prices – Here’s Why

gold rise

Governments will need and want and will engineer higher gold prices because it is their primary method of dealing with otherwise unserviceable debt. Higher gold prices will have the effect of debasing/devaluing their respective currencies which is the result they're looking for. Dramatically cheaper currencies mean that the debt can be serviced much more readily.

Read More »