Saturday , 23 September 2017


Derivatives Are Nothing More Than A “Game” of Russian Roulette! Here’s Why

Russian Roulette: Put one bullet in the cylinder of a revolver, spin the cylinder, point the gun at YOUR head, andrisk pull the trigger. Most revolvers have 6 chambers, so your odds of surviving are 5 in 6, IF you quit after pulling the trigger once. Press your luck, spin the cylinder, point the gun, and pull the trigger again. It might be okay. Try for a third time? Now let’s play Russian roulette – derivatives style.

The above are edited excerpts from an article* by GE Christenson (DeviantInvestor.com) entitled Russian Roulette – Derivatives Style.

The following article is presented by Lorimer Wilson, editor of www.munKNEE.com (Your Key to Making Money!)www.FinancialArticleSummariesToday.com (A site for sore eyes and inquisitive minds) and the FREE Market Intelligence Report newsletter (sample here; register here) and has been edited, abridged and/or reformatted (some sub-titles and bold/italics emphases) for the sake of clarity and brevity to ensure a fast and easy read. This paragraph must be included in any article re-posting to avoid copyright infringement.

Christenson goes on to say in further edited excerpts:

Now play Russian Roulette – Derivative Style

Note: I have no insider knowledge regarding derivatives…but I think we can assume the following:

  • Total face value of unregulated derivative contracts is something around 1,000 Trillion dollars – depending on who is counting and who is lying.
  • Banks (Goldman, JP Morgan, Deutsche Bank, etc.) sell these contracts because they generate huge commissions and probably other long-term profits.
  • Wall Street banks poured mega-bucks into DC lobbyists to keep the derivative game running with minimal regulation and oversight. Obscene profits, not the public good, are the reason.
  • Except for commissions upfront, derivatives are supposedly a zero sum game. I win, you lose, and the bank gets a fee. It sounds like a bookie in Las Vegas. You put up $1.1 Billion to win $1.0 Billion. Somebody wins, somebody loses, and the casinos (derivative banks) take the $100 Million as a fee – roughly 5% of every dollar bet on either side.
  • Let’s be trusting and assume the derivative banks only take 1%, not 5%. If the notional value of derivative contracts is $1,000 Trillion and the fee is only 1%, the cumulative take for the banks writing contracts was $10 Trillion. That is a lot of CEO bonuses.
  • Even if the commission was one-tenth of a percent, the take was $1 Trillion in fees.
  • Eventually the system must fail, as commissions and fees suck capital out of the system each time a contract is written. More leverage and more indebtedness will not improve an unsustainable system.
  • But fees are collected as contracts are written, bonuses are paid, and taxpayers (via bail-outs) or depositors (via bail-ins) might have to cover the losses. Remember TARP and the Cyprus bail-ins!

Stay connected!

Another Trigger Pull!

  • Nothing goes wrong – no crash, no bank failures, no government default. This is unlikely, and more so each day.
  • Banks continue writing derivative contracts because they can and why would they stop? Let’s guess another $1,000 Trillion each decade in new contracts.
  • Banks collect a commission that generates perhaps $1 Trillion or more in fees; this is $1 Trillion (or maybe much more) sucked out of the financial system each decade – and it produced nothing. It reminds me of the phrase, “the rich get richer, and the poor get poorer.”

Implications

  • In ideal circumstances, there is no crash, no bank failures, and all debts get paid.
  • But derivatives suck a huge amount of capital out of the global economies each year, and that makes ideal circumstances increasingly difficult to maintain. Instead of paying banker bonuses, that capital could be used for constructive projects.
  • The financial system is unlikely to continue operating under ideal circumstances. When another 2008 crisis arrives, the supposed zero sum game, less commissions of course, becomes a black hole of daisy-chained obligations that might collapse the American, European, and Asian financial systems. It has happened before.
  • The resulting financial and social chaos will not be pretty!

Got gold? Own silver? They are financial insurance, unless you trust that Wall Street will take care of your needs.

 
Editor’s Note: The author’s views and conclusions in the above article are unaltered and no personal comments have been included to maintain the integrity of the original post. Furthermore, the views, conclusions and any recommendations offered in this article are not to be construed as an endorsement of such by the editor.

*http://www.deviantinvestor.com/5905/russian-roulette/ (Copyright © 2014 – All Rights Reserved)

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