Saturday , 10 December 2016


Does “Sell In May & Go Away” still hold true?

One of the most enduring of Wall Street axioms – falling somewhere under “buy low and sell high” but above “greed is good” – is to “sell in May and go away” and, indeed, there appeared to be some truth to the saying. Between 1950 and 2012, the Dow Jones gained an average of 7.6% annually during the November-April period, but only 0.4% during May-October. Does “Sell In May and Go Away” still hold true as a viable investment strategy? Not according to my analysis as put forth in this article.

HERE are the details from the original post.

GO HERE for more on the merits of selling in May & going away.

sell in may

Check out these articles too:

“Sell In May” Often A Big Mistake Historically

Myth Or Reality: ‘Sell In May’

Related Articles from the munKNEE.com Vault:

1. May Day! May Day! Should You “Sell in May and Go Away”?

Many articles have been posted today, May 1st, regarding the investing adage “sell in May and go away”. Below are links to 10 such articles on the subject to help you decide what course of action you should take. Read More »

2. Stocks: ‘Sell In May And Go Away’ – or Even Sooner! Here’s Why

Taking profits is rarely a bad idea, and staying fully invested at these levels seems foolish. That is why it might pay to raise some capital now, before the sell in May strategy comes up. Having a core position of equities along with some dry powder and keeping a look out for short-term trading opportunities is how I plan to play this market through 2013. [This article presents 5 specific reasons why it might be wise sell in May and go away – or even sooner – this year.] Words: 1280 Read More »

3. Stop! If You Sell in May and Go Away This Year You’ll Regret It – Here’s Why

The adage “sell in May and go away” refers to selling one’s stocks in May, going into cash, and then waiting until November before buying back into the market. That] has worked the past two years…[This time round, however,] we believe there is a high probability that you would be buying at a higher price [in November] than… [what if you were to sell out] in May of 2012. [Let us explain why we are of that view.] Words: 406 Read More »
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Financial markets are influenced by relatively predictable cycles…[and should] play a big role in one’s decision-making process just as they do in our day-to-day lives. This article, part 1 of a 3 part series, takes a look at several and discusses their relevance to one’s investment management process.
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