Thursday , 28 July 2016

How Realistic Is $5,000 Gold?

Taking into account 11 key measurements based on historical movements and price ratios, gold is likely to exceed $5,000 and silver is likely to exceed $200 within the next 5 years. If silver reverts to its historical ratio of 16 to 1 with gold, then it could rise even higher. Let me explain. Words: 661

So says Chris Mack (tradeplacer.com) in a recent article* which Lorimer Wilson, editor of www.munKNEE.com, has reformatted into edited […] excerpts below for the sake of clarity and brevity to ensure a fast and easy read. (Please note that this paragraph must be included in any article reposting to avoid copyright infringement.) Mack goes on to say:

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Gold and Silver Have MUCH Higher to Run
Gold has risen every year for 11 years in a row now, demonstrating a powerful bull market that began in 2000. Since gold bull markets tend to last 15 to 18 years, investors are wondering how much potential the precious metals have in them. Gold and silver have to move substantially higher to revert to their inflation adjusted highs. However further dollar devaluation could multiply the potential gains.

Gold
$10,226 – Current SGS inflation adjusted high 2015 with 6% inflation
$8,658 – Nasdaq 1995-2000, 6.66 factor
$7,949 – Gold 1975-1980
$7,689 – Current SGS inflation adjusted high
$7,240 – 1980 Dow to gold ratio of 1.5 to 1
$6,500 – 80% dollar devaluation
$5,430 – 1930’s Dow to gold ratio of 2 to 1
$4,719 – Nikkei 5yr 1985-1990, 3.63 factor
$4,697 – Adjusted by growth in money supply/gold supply
$3,618 – Current CPI adjusted high 2015 with 6% inflation
$2,382 – Current CPI adjusted high
$6,241.64 – Average

Silver
$594 – Current SGS inflation adjusted high 2015 with 6% inflation
$447 – Current SGS inflation adjusted high
$434 – 1980 Dow to silver ratio of 25 to 1
$410 – 80% dollar devaluation and return to 1/16 gold
$276 – Adjusted by growth in money supply/gold supply
$200 – Silver 1975-1980
$184 – Current CPI adjusted high 2015 with 6% inflation
$139 – Current CPI adjusted high
$136 – Nasdaq 1995-2000, 6.66 factor
$102 – 80% dollar devaluation
$74 – Nikkei 5yr 1985-1990, 3.63 factor
$272.36 – Average

The above analyses are in keeping with the projections of 83 other prognosticators, the majority of whom see gold reaching a parabolic price peak of at least $5,000 (see here for the 83 individuals and their projections and here for comments on Jim Sinclair’s $1 million dollar bet that gold will reach $1,650 by January, 2011), and silver going as high as $712 (see here for the rationale for such an extremely high price based on $10,000 gold and here for the reasoning behind James Turk’s contention that silver is going to $400 by 2015 and gold to $8,000).

While most of these statistics use the 1980 highs in gold and silver as a proxy, there is much more potential for a greater move in precious metals now because currency and economic imbalances are not confined to the U.S. but are global. If the US dollar is devalued, it is likely that the Euro, Yen and other currencies would also be devalued. While the 1970’s bull market in gold and silver was largely driven by U.S. buyers, a panic to buy precious metals within the next 5 years will be driven globally.

Conclusion
As I said in the opening paragraph, “gold is likely to exceed $5,000 and silver is likely to exceed $200 within the next 5 years. If silver reverts to its historical ratio of 16 to 1 with gold, then it could rise even higher.”

Given what you have read above would you not agree that you should buy some (or more) gold and/or silver at the first sign of any temporary weakness in price? I certainly think so!

*http://tradeplacer.com/blog/2010/09/26/1285512240000.html (Chris Mack is President of Trade Placer (tradeplacer.com) which brings the “Power of Wallstreet on Mainstreet” to its readers and can be contacted at info@tradeplacer.com.)

– The above article consists of reformatted edited excerpts from the original for the sake of brevity, clarity and to ensure a fast and easy read. The author’s views and conclusions are unaltered.
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One comment

  1. How the hell can you say gold bull markets last 15-18 years, when in the last 40 years the only bull market for gold around 1980 lasted about 2 years? What data are you referring to?