Thursday , 27 October 2016

IMF Proposing New World Currency to Replace U.S. Dollar and Other National Currencies!

Over the past few years, there have been many rumors about a coming globalcurrency-300x2831 currency, but at times it has been difficult to pin down evidence that plans for such a currency are actually in the works but not anymore.  A shocking new report by the IMF is proposing just that – a global currency beyond national control! Words: 820

So says an article* on which Lorimer Wilson, editor of, has reformatted into edited […] excerpts below for the sake of clarity and brevity to ensure a fast and easy read. (Please note that this paragraph must be included in any article reposting to avoid copyright infringement.)

The article goes on to say in further edited excerpts:

More on the Proposed New Global Currency

The IMF recommended on April 13, 2010 that the world adopt a global currency called the “Bancor” and that a global central bank be established to administer that currency. This is not hype and it is not a rumor. This is a very serious proposal in an official document from one of the mega-powerful institutions that is actually running the world economy. Anyone who follows the IMF knows that what the IMF wants, the IMF usually gets. So could a global currency known as the “Bancor” be on the horizon? That is now a legitimate question.

So where in the world did the name “Bancor” for a global currency come from? Well, it turns out that “Bancor” is the name of a hypothetical world currency unit once suggested by John Maynard Keynes. Keynes was a world famous British economist who headed the World Banking Commission that created the IMF during the Breton Woods negotiations and the IMF report referenced above proposed naming the coming world currency unit the “Bancor” in honor of Keynes.

So what about Special Drawing Rights (SDRs)? Over the past couple of years, SDRs have been touted as the coming global currency. Well, the report does envision making SDRs “the principal reserve asset” as we move towards a global currency unit….However, the report also acknowledges that SDRs do have some serious limitations. Since the value of SDRs are made up of a basket of currencies – U.S. dollar (44%); Euro (34%);  Yen (11%); Pound (11%) – so anything affecting those currencies will affect SDRs as well.

The IMF report recognizes that moving to SDRs is only a partial move away from the U.S. dollar as the world reserve currency and urges the adoption of a currency unit that would be truly international. The truth is that SDRs are clumsy and cumbersome. For now, SDRs must still be reconverted back into a national currency before they can be used, and that really limits their usefulness according to the report….so the IMF report believes that the adoption of a true global currency administered by a global central bank is the answer [to the shortcomings of the SDRs].

The authors of the report believe that it would be ideal if the “Bancor” would immediately be used as currency by many nations throughout the world, but they also acknowledge that a more “realistic” approach would be for the “Bancor” to circulate alongside national currencies at first.

A global central bank would print and administer the “Bancor”. It would be something like the Federal Reserve, only completely outside the control of any particular national government.

Is that what we really need – a world currency administered by an international central bank modeled after the Federal Reserve? Not at all! The Federal Reserve has devalued the U.S. dollar by over 95 percent since it was created and the U.S. government has accumulated the largest debt in the history of the world under this system – so now we want to impose such a system on the entire globe? [I think not!] Considering how disastrous the Federal Reserve system and other central banking systems around the world have been, why would anyone suggest that we go to a global central banking system modeled after the Federal Reserve?


A global currency (whether it be called the “Bancor” or given a different name entirely) would be a major blow to national sovereignty and would represent a major move towards global government. The truth is, however, that there are some very powerful interests that are absolutely determined to create a global currency and a global central bank for the global economy that we now live in.

It would be a major mistake to think a global currency can’t happen



  1. Very interesting view that could happen with the cooperation
    of the governing body.
    Would this mean finally acknowledging all debts unpaid by many big countries? To include every legitimate unsettled bearers instrument ?
    Fair to say coverage of the above would be swayed as honesty
    that is quite exceptable to any legitimate debt holder.

  2. Wow, this is really scary,

    Do you have any idea of what impact a new currency will have on the price of gold and silver (of course for silver you have the day by day industrial consumption so the impact might be lower … or I am wrong? )

    How would they ensure all countries will use this new currency? What if countries with strong currencies will not accept it?

    Best regards,