Monday , 25 September 2017


What Could Dropping Consumer Debt Mean for the S&P 500?

In the third quarter 2007 the American consumer was way out of shape when itDebt-130x90 came to the percentage of debt payments to disposable income, hitting a 30-year high at 14%… Today the ratio is nearing 30-year lows! Could this be good news for the markets???

So writes Chris Kimble (http://blog.kimblechartingsolutions.com) in edited excerpts from his latest post entitled Consumer in much better shape…lowest debt service ratio in 30-years!.

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The last two times the consumer…[was] in this kind of shape was back in the early 1980’s and early 1990’s, [during] times of stock market lows.  If the U.S. economy is a consumer driven economy, could this be good news for the markets???

(Editor’s Note: The author’s views and conclusions in the above article are unaltered and no personal comments have been included to maintain the integrity of the original post. Furthermore, the views, conclusions and any recommendations offered in this article are not to be construed as an endorsement of such by the editor.)

*http://blog.kimblechartingsolutions.com/2013/05/consumer-in-much-better-shape-lowest-debt-service-ratio-in-30-years/

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