Sunday , 20 September 2020


Debt & Deficits

What's Coming: A "Fiscal Meat Grinder," A "Fiscal Cliff" and a Potential "Major Market Meltdown"!

The International Monetary Fund, the U.S. Congressional Budget Office, the National Association of Manufacturers and many other authorities are now warning that with the largest tax increase in U.S. history — plus the largest government spending cuts our nation has ever seen - one of the deadliest financial crises in U.S. history is set to strike the U.S. economy beginning this coming New Year's Day. Barring a miracle in Washington..... Words: 1028

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Why The Government and The Economy Will Collapse (+2K Views)

The problems of the US government are insoluble. They will result in the sovereign default of the federal government and the collapse of the US economy. Monty Pelerin explains why: "The claimed debt of the Federal Government of $16 Trillion is enough to threaten its viability and that of the US economy. The current glide path of spending and revenues ensures that debt will increase. Explicit and implicit Treasury guarantees will be required to bail out failing public and private agencies. The situation becomes hopeless when the unfunded liabilities are taken into account."

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QE Is A Flawed, No Win, Strategy – Here's Why

Lately, nearly every piece of economic data is judged based on the degree to which investors perceive it will encourage/discourage central banks from embarking on a new round of quantitative easing (QE). Generally, bad data and subdued inflation is good because it means the Fed has both cause and room to ease, while good data and higher inflation are bad as they eliminate the need for easing and increase the chance that any asset purchases may contribute to already rising prices. That tendency to judge economic data in such a way is wrongheaded. [Let me explain why that is the case and more.] Words: 755

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Fiscal Tightening in 2013 and Its Economic Consequences

Under current law, a sharp reduction in the federal budget deficit between 2012 and 2013 will cause the economy to contract but, the Congressional Budget Office projects, will also put federal debt on a path more likely to be sustainable over time. To illustrate the effects of fiscal tightening, CBO compared its projections under current law (the "baseline" projections) with projections under an alternative set of policies — two scenarios in a broad spectrum of choices - in the infographic below.

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Eric Sprott: More Government Spending Is NOT the Answer to Our Economic Woes – Here’s Why

In today’s overleveraged world, greater deficits and government spending, financed by an expansion of public debt and the monetary base (“the printing press”), are not the answer to our economic woes. In fact, these policies have been proven to have a negative impact on growth. [Therefore] as long as we continue down this path, the “solution” will continue to be the problem. There is no miracle cure to our current woes and recent proposals by central planners risk worsening the economic outlook for decades to come. [Let us explain.] Words: 1510

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The Fiscal Cliff: Everything You Need To Know About It & Its Implications

The U.S. federal government is scheduled to implement a fiscal tightening of unprecedented severity (approx. 5% of GDP) at the start of 2013. The last time a tightening of such proportions occurred (3% of GDP in 1969) it presaged a recession. Thus, unless mitigated by an act of Congress, we expect the fiscal cliff would lead the U.S. into a recession in 2013. Below, in 26 charts, we examine all aspects of the impending crisis to gauge its potential impact on the credit markets and, by extension, our strategic investment recommendations.

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Fact #1: Revenue Does Not Cover Core US Programs

Face the Facts USA is delivering 100 provocative facts about big issues over the next 100 days leading up to the November elections to help Americans debunk myths, hold better conversations, get involved, and make choices as smarter citizens. Here is Fact #1 with supporting substantiation.

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