Wednesday , 26 September 2018


A Close Look At the U.S. Dollar: Shelf Life, Supply & Total Value By Denomination

Today’s infographic from TitleMax… illustrates the U.S. supply of currency notes, the shelf life of each type of bill, and how the whole system works as a whole.

The original infographic has been edited here for length (…) and clarity ([ ])

When you think about it, the journey of each individual currency note is pretty incredible.

  • After being printed or minted, each bill is then passed between people and businesses to facilitate transactions.
  •  >If it’s a $1 or $5 bill, it changes hands on average about 110 times per year.
  • > If it’s a $20 bill, it’s more like 75.

The interesting part is that almost every transaction is linked to the one before it, and the series of subsequent transactions for each bill creates a unique, broad story. By the time a bill is retired, it would have facilitated many hundreds of transactions that enabled everything from the purchase of used cars to the shadier deals in underground markets. It’s a pretty interesting tale for such a little piece of paper.

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